The 1800s

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Modern Theatre in Context: A Critical Timeline

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Djanet Sears in 'Afrika Solo'

Publication of Canada's first published stage play by a person of African descent occurs when Sister Vision Press issues Djanet Sears's Afrika Solo, initially produced by Factory Theatre Lab in 1989, and winning the 1991 International Armstrong Award for Outstanding Radio Play for a version broadcast by the CBC in 1990.

The first Colway Trust-style community play appears in Canada with the production of Dale Hamilton's The Spirit of Shivaree in the Ontario township of Eramosa, under the direction of John Oram.

The first full production of Monique Mojica's Princess Pocahontas and the Blue Spots, is staged by Theatre Passe Muraille and Nightwood Theatre. Directed by Muriel Miguel, it features Monique Mojica, who has also acted in plays by Daniel David Moses and Drew Hayden Taylor, as well as appearing in Tomson Highway's The Rez Sisters and Djanet Sears's The Adventures of a Black Girl in Search of God. Mojica co-founds Turtle Gals, a Native women's performance ensemble, who perform their first original piece, The Scrubbing Project as Playwrights in Residence for Nightwood Theatre's 1999-2000 season.

A gala tribute held at Hart House Theatre, Toronto, marks the emergence of Canadian theatre reviewing, honouring the 80th birthday of Herbert Whittaker, theatre critic first at the Montreal Gazette from 1937 to 1949, then at The Globe and Mail (Toronto) from 1949-1975. The tribute is attended by a Who's Who of Canadian theatre in recognition of Whittaker's leading role in what he had always proclaimed as a fight for the advancement of Canadian theatrical culture.